I am a technical communicator with a love of explaining technical concepts in documentation, blog posts, videos, books and more. I run a small agency called Gregarious Mammal if you’re interested in hiring me for that kind of thing.

This website is a home for all my blog posts, podcasts, newsletters and creative projects.

It’s also new and very much in development, so watch this space. 👀

Next events

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  • November 25 2019 to November 26 2019

    Data Natives 2019 to hear about The influence of Data Science on Diversity, Sustainability and the Future of Business

  • November 27 2019 to November 29 2019

    5G Techritory Conference to hear about your ideas and projects

  • December 10 2019 to December 11 2019

    DevRelCon London to learn about Building developer experiences

Latest posts

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** What’s one of the first things you look at when you look at using a new project?**

I appreciate that not everyone who writes documentation is a native English speaker, or even if they are, may not understand the best way to write clearly and concisely. Many native English speakers had our last grammar lesson more than 20 years ago, and have learnt the tips and tricks we now use as professional writers recently. There are three important things to remember to justify the time and effort of making your writing more understandable:

** What’s one of the first things you look at when you look at using a new project?**

Documentation structure applies to your documentation as a whole, and to each page. Let’s start at the top and work down.

A fullstack dapp for creating unique tradable tokens

This dapp implements is a Crypto-collectible game built on top of the ERC-721 standard for creating unique tokens.. This tutorial is intended to be followed using the online IDE available at studio.ethereum.org, and selecting the CryptoPizza template.

Latest podcasts

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A fantasy Greek perfect for your eyes

Fresh back from Tekom’s TCWorld event, Chris covers the difference between different types of tech writers, fantasy maps, running D&D campaigns with inconsistent players, is dark mode a myth, and why do so many cultures think Greek is so complicated?

WeWorld

In this episode I cover the WeWork/Meetup/Softbank world domination saga, the sad state of affairs of online journalism, and has Apple had enough of Electron?

The Apache Software Foundation, UNIX at 50 and the story of a floating hotel

In this episode I speak with David Nalley of the Apache Software Foundation about their roles in the projects they work with. Also features how an Australian floating hotel ended up in North Korea, D&D with sign language, long distance flights, and Happy birthday UNIX.

WTD Episode 25 - Researching how developers use API docs, with Andrew Head

In episode 25, we talk with Andrew Head, Ph.D. Candidate in Computer Science at UC Berkeley, about his research on how developers use API documentation. Specifically, we focused on a recent article he co-authored titled When Not to Comment: Questions and Tradeoffs with API Documentation for C++ Projects. During the podcast, we chat about the following: where developers look for information, how developers manage information in Google’s unique billion-line code base, when it’s appropriate to just let developers read the code directly versus creating documentation, what kind of information developers look for in API documentation, the relevance of document generators such as Doxygen, and more. Andrew also talked about some projects he’s working on to build interactive tools for developers to share code expertise.

Leemon Baird of Hedera Hashgraph, Wendys Horror, and GNU Start

In this episode I speak with Dr. Leemon Baird of Hedera Hashgraph about their DLT (not a Blockchain), plus the Saga of Richard Stallman continues, the history of Call of Cthulhu, and Wendys releases a RPG…

Recommendations and Newsletters

I currently curate 4 newsletters on Ethics (mostly in technology), Blockchain, Language and Linguistics, see my latest recommendations and join those newsletters below.

The Weekly Squeak Newsletter

My general newsletter "The Weekly Squeak" draws content from all these sources and a couple more, sign up to that below.

Latest ethics posts

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Newsletter coming soon, for now enjoy the posts below.

“When people fail to follow these bizarre, secret rules, and the machine does the wrong thing, its operators are blamed for not understanding the machine, for not following its rigid specifications. With everyday objects, the result is frustration.
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Ever feel like you’re being prompted into going along with something you don’t want because better options aren’t clearly being presented? You probably just found a dark pattern. “Dark patterns” are designs that deliberately trick you into doing what a company wants.
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Dark design patterns use all of the powers of visual design with the flair of a magician’s misdirection, and the language of a shady sideshow barker (dare you to say ‘shady sideshow barker’ eight times in a row).
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Why should we believe any of the people responsible for the ongoing tech bubble when they claim what they’re doing has great benefit for humanity? Listening to them, you might think that rising inequality, rampant tax evasion, and ecological devastation are simply capitalism run amok.
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The scientists who make apps addictive

from The Economist 1843
In 1930, a psychologist at Harvard University called B.F. Skinner made a box and placed a hungry rat inside it. The box had a lever on one side. As the rat moved about it would accidentally knock the lever and, when it did so, a food pellet would drop into the box.
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Latest language posts

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Newsletter coming soon, for now enjoy the posts below.

It’s a curious thing when there is an idiom—structured roughly the same way and meaning essentially the same thing—that exists in a large number of languages. It’s even more curious when that idiom, having emerged in dozens of different languages, is actually … about language.
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Hungarian kids know, do you? English grammar, beloved by sticklers, is also feared by non-native speakers. Many of its idiosyncrasies can turn into traps even for the most confident users.
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AI and brain-scanning technology could soon make it possible to reliably detect when people are lying. But do we really want to know? By We learn to lie as children, between the ages of two and five. By adulthood, we are prolific.
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Chatbots and conversational computing present many contextual user experience challenges: humor, for example. And that’s before even considering if the content was funny to begin with. Luckily, we still have humans with interests in dramatic arts still around. For now.
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MIT student uses machine-learning to teach a machine how to compose sonnets. Machine learning was recently named as the force behind a potential cure for HIV, but now it’s a process that is also capable of more artistic endeavours. MIT PhD student J.
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Latest blockchain posts

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Newsletter coming soon, for now enjoy the posts below.

There are five key areas that need to be addressed to make the next generation of blockchain products and services more user friendly. By Ward Oosterlijnck, Creative Technologist, Portable.
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Explaining crypto is hard, explaining crypto in simple words is harder. Explaining Zero Knowledge Proof to a child? Easy! So here you go — ZKP explained with some Halloween candy.
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Odds are you’ve heard about the Ethereum blockchain, whether or not you know what it is. It’s been in the news a lot lately, including the cover of some major magazines, but reading those articles can be like gibberish if you don’t have a foundation for what exactly Ethereum is.
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This text was produced by Zero Knowledge, a podcast hosted by Anna Rose and Fredrik Harryson, which explores the decentralised technology that will power the emerging Web3 and the community building it.
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This is the first part of many (we hope) articles about Ethereum 2.0 as we get closer to its release. Serenity or Ethereum 2.
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